“Making a Murderer’s” Brendan Dassey loses bid to take his case to U.S. Supreme Court

“Making a Murderer’s” Brendan Dassey loses bid to take his case to U.S. Supreme Court

Source:  Variety

The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to take up the case of Brendan Dassey who was featured in the hit Netflix documentary series, “Making a Murderer.”

Dassey is serving a life sentence after being convicted along with his uncle, Steven Avery, in separate jury trials for the 2005 rape and murder of photographer Teresa Halbach in Manitowoc County, Wisconsin.

The nation’s highest court gave no reason for the denial. Dassey’s attorneys claim that his confession to the police was coerced.

The denial means that the Supreme Court will not review the decision on Dassey’s case made by the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in December. That court voted 4-3 that Dassey’s confession was voluntary.

Read the story at Variety.

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Attention “Serial” fans: Adnan Syed will be the subject of an HBO documentary series.  Will pick up where the podcast left off.

Attention “Serial” fans: Adnan Syed will be the subject of an HBO documentary series. Will pick up where the podcast left off.

We’re getting more “Serial”—well, sort of. Adnan Syed, the podcast’s subject currently serving a life sentence for the 1999 murder of his 18-year-old ex-girlfriend, Hae Min Lee, will be the focus of an all-new, four-hour documentary series from Sky and HBO.

The upcoming docuseries, “The Case Against Adnan Syed,” will be directed by Oscar-nominated documentarian Amy Berg, who has reportedly been working on it since 2015—right after the first season of “Serial” wrapped its run.

According to the show’s synopsis, Berg’s doc “will offer a cinematic look at the life and 1999 murder of Hae Min Lee and conviction of Adnan Syed, from the genesis of their high school relationship to the original police investigation and trial.”

But the show won’t just be a visual rehash of Sarah Koenig’s 2014 podcast. It will also pick up where “Serial” left off, giving us a look at the last few years Syed has spent fighting for—and eventually being granted—a new trial.

Plus, the show is promising “new discoveries” and “groundbreaking revelations that challenge the state’s case,” whatever those might be.

Read the story at VICE.

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Netflix’s new true-crime series “Evil Genius” looks completely bonkers

Netflix’s new true-crime series “Evil Genius” looks completely bonkers

Source:  VICE

Netflix just released the trailer for the Duplass brothers’ next true-crime docuseries, “Evil Genius,” about the 2003 “pizza bomber heist,” and it looks even crazier than “Wild Wild Country.”

Back in August of 2003, a pizza delivery man robbed a bank in Erie, Pennsylvania with a bomb locked around his neck. Police caught the guy only 15 minutes later, but as they arrested him, the delivery guy began frantically warning them that the bomb was going to explode.

Cops called in a bomb squad, but before it could arrive, the homemade collar bomb went off, killing the pizza guy while he sat cuffed on the street.

The story just got weirder from there. Cops searched the dead man’s car and discovered a letter addressed to the “Bomb Hostage” which mapped out a complicated  “Saw”-like scavenger hunt that the man would have to do to retrieve three keys that would eventually unlock the collar from his neck. Robbing the bank was just step one

Read the story at VICE.

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Two chilling documentaries are coming to Netflix to feed your true crime obsession

Two chilling documentaries are coming to Netflix to feed your true crime obsession

Source:  Nylon

As if true crime fans didn’t already have to watch, Netflix is adding two new shows to its roster.

First up is three new installments of “The Staircase” which first aired on the Sundance Channel in 2004. It follows the story of author Michael Peterson who was accused of killing his wife in 2001 after her body was found at the bottom of a staircase. What follows is a compelling tale of “did he or didn’t he” plus a 16-year battle in court.

The second series is “Evil Genius: The True Story of America’s Most Diabolical Bank Heist.” The docuseries takes a look at a 2003 robbery gone wrong when Brian Wells, a pizza deliveryman, said that a group of people fastened a bomb to his chest and forced him to rob a bank in Erie, Pennsylvania. Before the police bomb squad could get to Wells, the device went off, killing him.

“Evil Genius” introduces viewers to a bizarre collection of Midwestern hoarders, outcasts, and lawbreakers playing cat-and-mouse with the FBI.

Marjorie Diehl-Armstrong and Kenneth Barnes were eventually arrested and sent to prison for the crime, but the series is out to prove that there’s more to the killings than everyone thinks.

Read the story at Nylon. 

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“Making a Murderer’s” Brendan Dassey asks Supreme Court to throw out his confession

“Making a Murderer’s” Brendan Dassey asks Supreme Court to throw out his confession

Source:  The Washington Post

Brendan Dassey, whose conviction was highlighted in the popular Netflix documentary “Making a Murderer,” asked the Supreme Court on Tuesday to throw out the confession he made more than a decade ago, saying it was improperly coerced.

The controversial interrogation of the then-16-year-old was featured in the award-winning documentary which premiered in 2015.

His confession has been both affirmed and thrown out by lower courts, and his lawyers are now arguing that the Supreme Court should weigh in.

Read the story at The Washington Post.

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Five Criminal Injustice Documentaries to Watch on Netflix

Five Criminal Injustice Documentaries to Watch on Netflix

Source:  Netflix Life

Long Shot – When Juan Catalan is arrested for a murder he insists he didn’t commit, he builds his case for innocence around raw footage from popular TV show “Curb Your Enthusiasm.”

The Confession Tapes – A collection of six cases where police, working with little physical evidence, use questionable tactics to elicit confessions from vulnerable suspects. This series takes a hard look at injustice in the interrogation process.

Time: The Kalief Browder Story – A 16-year old is arrested and held at New York’s infamous Rikers Island correctional facility while he awaits trial. What happens while he is there would ruin his life. His story however, would help initiate changes in the way prisoners are treated.

Strong Island – Filmmaker Yance Ford takes you through his family history as he shares the story of his brother’s murder and the circumstances that allowed his killer to go free.

Out of Thin Air – The U.S. doesn’t have a monopoly on criminal injustice. “Out of Thin Air” takes place in Iceland back in 1976. The film covers the biggest criminal investigation in that country’s history. When two men go missing, the public pressure to find the killers drives investigators to coerce confessions from six problematic young people.

Read the story at Netflix Life.

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